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biopsy
nervate 2k
dsbp   2000
  see also
"third stroke"
dsbp records homepage

album rating: 2
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submitted by ben on 3-Nov-2001
Originally unleashed back in 1995 through the now-defunct Brazilian label Cri Du Chat, Nervate was the first ever Biopsy release. It has been out-of-print and hard to come by for a number of years, but with this reissue DSBP makes it readily available once again, and can now lay claim to all three Biopsy releases in their catalog.

Biopsy is a side-project from two members of Aghast View, Guilherme Pires and Fabricio Viscardi. Hailing from Brazil, they deliver a harsh, no-holds-barred hybrid of electro, EBM, metal, and even a little classical guitar ("Disclosure") or flute ("Close Enough"), if the mood to sample strikes them.

This is not your standard reissue, which comes remastered and replete with slick new artwork and a great pair of previously unreleased tracks. It's hard not to compare the older material against the new stuff, which is stuck right in the middle of the disc. The only real differences that stand out are a lack of guitars in the fresh tracks, which slow down the pace and deliver a more polished electro sound. They're a nice addition to the release.

When the opening track, "Straight Sign," kicked in for the first time it was unmistakably the same Biopsy I've come to know through the strong Cervix State Sequences and Third Stroke discs. The harsh, metallic guitars, chopped up and resampled, drive the track in front of heavy-hitting programmed beats and Viscardi's gruff, speedy vocals. There isn't a great deal of sampling, which is prevalent with a lot of their later material; instead the duo seem to opt for a more original pool of source material.

After hearing this introduction I got the impression that Nervate 2K was the same powerful Biopsy, with a more raw and straightforward approach that comes with being dated. Even so, not only does this reissue hold its own against its two predecessors, it easily matches them in quality and intensity. This wasn't simply rehashed to cash in on the recognition they've received since DSBP brought them to North America - this material truly deserved to be reacquainted with the light of day.

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